Learn About Music Therapy - September 12, 2017 

Sign Up Now - Boomwhacker Choir - September 11 

Dr. Jacobi Honored - June 2017 

Month of the Military Child - April 2017 

March 25, 2017 - The Landings Club Event 

April 2016 - Military Family Programs 

Kiwanis Continues for Sixth Year - October 2014 

Month of the Military Child - April 2014 Feedback 

Month of Military Child - April 2014 

Kiwanis Financial Support Again - October 2013 

American Music Therapy Assoc. - October 2012 

Kiwanis Support for MMI Continues - October 2012 

Month of the Military Child - April 2012 

Month of the Military Child - April 2011 

MMI Hosts Training Session - January 2011 

The Landings Association - November 2010 

Kiwanis Continues MMI Support - September 2010 

Cinco de Mayo - May 2010 

Fundraising Concert - November 2009 

MMI Program Featured - October 2009 

Kiwanis Awards Grant to MMI - Sept. 2009 

MMI Receives Grant for Instruments - July 2009 

Music Medicine and Military Families - June 2009 

MMI Featured on WTOC-TV - April 2009 

U.S. Service Members Honored - June 2009 

Community Health Mission Fundraiser - April 2009 

MMI Introduction - Spring 2009 

 

"You can look at disease as a form of disharmony.  And there's no organ system in the body that's not affected by sound and music and vibration."  Mitchell Gaynor, M.D., “Sounds of Healing”                       


The following article appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Giving Thanks magazine, published by the St. Joseph's/Candler Foundations.

Healing Hits a High Note

The Music Medicine Institute, a non-profit organization affiliated with St. Joseph’s/Candler, has made a $30,000 gift to the St. Joseph’s/Candler Foundations to introduce music therapy educational and clinical care services and research at the health system.

Eli
zabeth Jacobi, Ph.D., RMT, founder and director of the institute, says the affiliation allows the hospital to “enhance the quality of life of those with acute or chronic illness through a collaboration of music and medicine.”

“The relationship between music and medicine is both intimate and ancient,” says Dr. Jacobi, a Registered Music Therapist, researcher and former teacher, administrator and professional opera singer.  “For thousands of years, healers have recognized the power of sound vibrations and music to affect the healing process.”

Today, music therapists, typically part of an interdisciplinary healthcare team, use music to address physical, psychological, cognitive, social and spiritual needs of adults and children. This includes patients with acute and chronic illness, pain, grief, physical disabilities, and neurological impairments.

Music therapists must complete an approved course of study of the American Music
Therapy Association and pass a national examination to earn their Music Therapist-Board Certified (MT-BC) credential.

“The Music Medicine Institute has allowed us to contract Amy Adams, an MT-BC currently working with patients in our oncology unit,” says Cindy Johnson, RN, MSN, Director of Educational Services at St. Joseph’s/Candler.  “We started there because the oncology staff is particularly sensitive to meeting the many different patient needs they see.  Music therapy is relatively new here so Amy is not only helping our patients, she is also educating her medical coworkers about the benefits of music therapy.  Music therapy is a wonderful fit with St. Joseph’s/Candler’s holistic approach to health care.”

Dr. Jacobi, whose doctorate is in clinical psychology and who trained in behavioral medicine at Harvard Medical School, conducts research in the therapeutic benefits of music and imagery. 

Noting that she has herself suffered from arthritis since the age of four, Dr. Jacobi did doctoral work in the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music, a music-assisted process of self-discovery.  It employs classical music, relaxation techniques and a trained facilitator to promote general mind, body and spiritual health; provide non-pharmacological management of pain and discomfort; moderate negative thoughts and emotions; reduce anxiety and promote relaxation; and more in those who suffer from diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and other afflictions.

“I have been able to overcome my own pain and suffering,” she says, adding that she no longer takes pain medication and has integrated Bonny Method techniques into her lifestyle.  “Through my work, and through the Music Medicine Institute’s affiliation with St. Joseph’s/Candler, I want to bring the healing qualities of music and a positive spirit to others.”

For more information, contact the Music Medicine Foundation.